Moving your body to save the planet

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I’m sure I wasn’t the only one to be both saddened and yet fascinated by David Attenborough’s recent climate change documentary. Saddened by the seemingly relentless onset of global warming and yet fascinated by some of the science behind how we can still reverse it. From electric planes and hydrogen cars to adapting our lifestyle and food choices, there’s certainly a lot of positive action we can take, and it got me thinking about active lifestyles and the role they might play.

A few simple changes

So let’s start with what I think is the obvious one: Travel. We know that driving our billions of cars around every day isn’t good for CO2 emissions. How can we reduce that?

Well if you live less than 2 miles from your destination then walking (or even running) is one option. I know this doesn’t apply to the average commuter but many of us do still take our cars on small journeys. I know I do and it’s something I’m trying to change. Unfortunately, the notion of saving the planet may not be enough to make us change our behaviour. After all, climate change can seem like such a massive problem that taking a short walk hardly seems sufficient to make an impact, so what if we try shifting our perspective?

What if the short walk is repeated every day, or even every other day?  A 2 mile trip could take 30 mins and if you’re going you probably need to come back so that’s 60 mins. Do this 4 times a week and you’ve walked 240 mins in a week. The Department of Health currently recommends at least 150 mins per week of moderate activity. This means that if you walk briskly enough to get your heart rate up you’re going to be smashing your weekly activity quota, gaining enormous health and mental wellbeing benefits, oh, and helping save the plant too -BONUS!

Ok, so I already mentioned that a 2 mile commute isn’t convenient for all of us. But maybe it’s 2 miles to the shops, or the school run? I know, I know, then there’s shopping to carry and kids to shepherd. There’s always an element of challenge involved. My approach is to consider what is possible and start there. No matter how small a step it may seem at first.

Start the day with a boost

What about using more public transport? It’s bound to require some extra walking, particularly as it rarely takes you exactly where you need to be. In health and fitness terms though, this is an advantage. Also, if you’re late you may have to break into a light run! That run a bit, walk a bit, run a bit, walk a bit, that you do when trying to get somewhere on time has been re-packaged by the Fitness Industry as HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). You can do it for free when you run late for a bus!

When we run late and arrive at our workplace or appointment a little flushed, we might feel inconvenienced, but we should also consider that studies show that short bursts of exercise can increase oxygen and neuro-transmitters in the brain. Rather than feel awkward, we can be smug that our brains are running far more effectively than if we had drifted in from our cars.

Being amongst people is also good for us socially. Even having someone to smile at and say “Good Morning” to is a boost. You don’t have to get engaged in full conversation (unless you want to). The time can be used to read that book you’ve been meaning to get to or listen to a motivational podcast. Travel time doesn’t have to be ‘dead’ time, it can be an opportunity to stimulate your brain in other ways. If you’re trying to make positive changes to your lifestyle then this is helpful in increasing the neuroplasticity of your brain. The more your brain is challenged in different directions the more it learns to grow and adapt. This is exactly what we want if we are trying to overcome lifetime bad habits, or simply make small changes to improve our health.

Get creative

There are many other potential overlaps between taking care of ourselves and taking care of the planet. I heard of one guy who converted his exercise bike so he could only generate the power to watch Netflix by pedalling! A less technological activity is simply growing your own vegetables. This comes with the added bonus of being outdoors, which again has great wellbeing benefits.

So my conclusion is this. There are lots of ways we can combine a desire to be physically active with a desire to protect the planet for ourselves and our children.

It can take a little imagination, a little determination and yes a bit of an adjustment in mindset, but these are qualities and abilities that all humans possess and the result is truly win-win-win.

There seems to be so many things in life we wish were better at, and it can feel overwhelming. The brilliant thing about adopting an active lifestyle (in my humble opinion) is it offers an opportunity to make lots of things better, all at once! (Did I mention being active can also reduce feelings of overwhelm?!) Our bodies were designed to move and in turn moving our bodies supports our health, wellbeing and the health & wellbeing of the world around us. We can use this valuble asset we all possess and be the change we went to see.

Do you have ways of combining being active with helping the planet? If so I’d love to hear your thoughts. Get in touch in the comments below.